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Africa: Algeria Crowned Champions of Africa for the Second Time

allAfrica  

[CAF] Cairo -Baghdad Bounedjah's first minute deflected effort handed Algeria their second Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) title after a 29-year wait with a 1-0 victory over Senegal in a highly charged final at the Cairo International Stadium on Friday night.

Africa Cup of Nations 2019: How well do you remember this year's tournament?

BBC News Africa  

How well do you remember the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations, which has just finished?

Kenya: President Commissions Africa's Largest Wind Power Project

allAfrica  

[Nation] President Uhuru Kenyatta officially commissioned Africa's biggest wind power plant, a mammoth project in Marsabit County that now provides nearly a fifth of the country's energy needs.

South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa accused in corruption row

BBC News Africa  

President Cyril Ramaphosa accused by watchdog of misleading parliament and potential money laundering.

Africa Top10 Business News

AfricaDotcom  

Tshilidzi Marwala from the South African Presidential Commission on the Fourth Industrial Revolution says " We need to develop technological capacity to gather, process and monetize the African database.

Ghana's ex-First Lady graduates from UK varsity

Africanews  

Ghana’s former first lady, Lordina Mahama, has graduated with a Masters of Laws from a United Kingdom University, multiple local media portals have reported. The state-run Daily Graphic said Mrs. Mahama was awarded Masters of Laws (LLM) degree in Business Law / International Business Law from the De Montfort University located in Leicester. The former First Lady according to the Daily Graphic report had studied as a long-distance student over the period she was enrolled. She already holds a Master’s Degree in Governance and Leadership plus a first degree in Hospitality Management from one of the country’s prestigious varsities, the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA). She had in her time as First Lady championed causes in the interest of women and children and was a key member of the Organization of African First Ladies. The 56-year-old is wife of John Dramani Mahama who served as president from 2011 till 2016. He had previously served as Vice-President to John Atta Mills who died in office. Congratulations H.E. Lordina Mahama (Master of Laws – Business Law) pic.twitter.com/k32rQowsyL— Edward Omane Boamah (@eomaneboamah) July 19, 2019 Mahama served out Mills’ tenure before winning a substantive first term in 2016. He failed to secure reelection in 2016 when incumbent Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo defeated him at the polls. Mahama has been chosen by the main opposition National Democratic Congress, NDC, to lead the party into the upcoming December 2020 elections. Akufo-Addo will be contesting for a second and final term.

Trump meets persecuted Eritrean singer, Boko Haram survivor and others

Africanews  

As part of his meetings with survivors of religious persecution from across the world, U.S. president Donald Trump, met with a number of people at the White House on July 17. Among the group were two Africans – an Eritrean and a Nigerian with both victims sharing briefly their excitement to be at the White House. Eritrean gospel singer Helen Berhane who currently lives in Asylum in Denmark shared how she lived months in detention in a metal container back in Eritrea. She pleaded with the U.S. administration to also help rescue other victims of government persecution which continues in the country till date. The recent case was a rift with the Catholic Church that led to closing of over 30 health facilities. MS. BERHANE: My name is Helen. I’m from Eritrea. I’m a gospel singer. So I have been, for 32 months, in a metal shipping container because of my faith. “But the reason I am here — all our pastors, they are still in prison in Eritrea, including the patron (inaudible). So that is my message. I am a voice for those voiceless. THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. Appreciate it. MS. BERHANE: Thank you. We pray for you. Ms. Berhane was only released in 2006 after she felt critically ill. In a 2018 interview with the BBC, she confirmed that the government had asked her to stop singing which she said she could not do. “So I am singing more because of the situation I passed through and what I’m doing now. For me to sing is like before you go to war. So song is the key. So they know when you sing you have the power,” she told the BBC. Trump and Ivanka host two Chibok girls at the White House https://t.co/NTZdaeLBfc— africanews (@africanews) June 29, 2017 Nigeria’s Esther Bitrus on her part had a more brief interaction which entailed thanking Trump for the opportunity to meet him and reiterating how hard it was to have been abducted by Boko Haram. It is the second time Trump has met Boko Haram survivors. In 2017, he met with two girls who were among those that escaped from the infamous Chibok Girls raid in 2014. MS. BITRUS: Thank you, Mr. President — THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. Thank you. MS. BITRUS: — for the opportunity to see you. I am Esther, from Nigeria. I do three years in (inaudible). I escaped from Boko Haram. So thank you for …. THE PRESIDENT: It’s tough stuff, right? MS. BITRUS: Yes. THE PRESIDENT: That’s a tough one. Thank you. Other persons who were at the White House included Nobel Laureate Nadia Murad of Syria. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize of 2018 along with DR Congo’s Dr. Denis Mukwege. Others were from North Korea, Cuba, China, Bangladesh, New Zealand and Myanmar. “With us today are men and women of many different religious traditions from many different countries. But what you have in common is each of you has suffered tremendously for your faith. “You’ve endured harassment, threats, attacks, trials, imprisonment, and torture. I got to know many of you and helped you get some — get some of you out of the difficult situation that you were in. “I’m very proud of you in the way you’ve reacted to a different life. It is a tremendous thing,” a White House transcript of Trump’s remarks read.

Nigeria: Wizkid's Manager Denies Domestic Violence Post, Says Account Was Hacked

allAfrica  

[Daily Trust] Jada Pollock, Wizkid's manager and third babymama, has denied a viral post on social media accusing the singer of domestic violence, claiming that her Instagram account was hacked.

Ethiopia: Dozens Arrested After Clashes Between Security, Sidama Statehood Activists

allAfrica  

[Addis Standard] Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's regional state Police Commissioner Tewdros Weldemichael said there have been human casualties and property damages in various parts of the Sidama zone following yesterday's clashes which first started in Hawassa and its environs.

Burkinabes alarmed by deaths of 11 people in police custody

Africanews  

The deaths of 11 people in a Burkina Faso police custody on the night of Sunday to Monday this week have raised tensions in the capital, Ouagadougou. The west African Nation is one of the main transit points for drugs arriving from the ports of West Africa, from where it moves north towards the Malian and Libyan desert A relative of one of the victims, Flavien Dima has lots of questions begging for answers. “What happened? What happened? What happened? They caught him for drugs or for what reason? That’s the first thing. Second, why did he die?” It’s difficult, it’s a little difficult. Until now, no one in the family has seen the body. I don’t know how it usually goes, but there wasn’t a report that anyone saw the body before the autopsy began”, he said. Civil society groups have in the past denounced violence by security forces. “This is a general observation in the security services. The conditions of detention, hygiene and sanitary conditions in police custody rooms are not very good’‘, said Police Union Secretary-General, Armiyaho Zongo. The public prosecutor, Maiza Sérémé said Forensic doctors were required to carry out the examinations and autopsies necessary to determine the causes of these deaths. Last June, the authorities burnt 35,300 tonnes of drugs, representing a quarter of all seizures in 2018, according to the permanent secretariat of the National Committee in Combating Drugs. AFP

Zimbabwe: Watchdog Orders Inquiry Into Magaya Rape Allegations

allAfrica  

[263Chat] Women rights pressure groups have called on the government to urgently set up a commission of inquiry into the alleged rape cases levelled against Prophetic Healing and Deliverance (PHD) Ministries founder, Walter Magaya, 263Chat can report.

Afcon 2019: Algeria's Riyad Mahrez feels love of his home town

BBC News Africa  

Algeria's attempt to win the Afcon 2019 final will be led by Manchester City star Riyad Mahrez.

License to influence: UAE law regulates social media players

Africanews  

In a bid to regulate the social media marketing industry, the UAE has made licenses for commercialised influencers mandatory. About 1,700 licenses have been issued in the UAE so far. They’re priced at around $4,000 dollars a year and require applicants to be a minimum of 21 years old plus hold a bachelor’s degree. “Before, it was rather chaotic,” says Naser Al Tamimi, the director of media licenses at the UAE National Media Council. “People know what rights they have and what they’re responsible for. Companies know what their right are and what they’re responsible for.” Influencers can bypass some of these requirements and costs, however, by joining a media agency and working under that company’s license. [IME S02E26 MAIN ARTICLE – SECONDARY IMAGE 1] Influencer management agency licensed in the UAE Founder of the brand and influencer management agency Sunday [https://www.sunday.plus], Ashley Cadzow, states that the MENA region is home to some of the most expensive influencers in the world. It’s not uncommon, he says, for social media stars to command anywhere between $3,000-100,000 per deal. Moreover, since the region is considered something of an untapped resource, many companies are willing to pay top dollar to reach potential customers. “I’m constantly sitting in meeting rooms with brands, and they’re sitting there saying, ‘How do we talk to Saudi Arabia? How do we talk to the wider GCC?’ ” says Cadzow. The answer, according to many analysts, is influencers. [IME S02E26 MAIN ARTICLE – SECONDARY IMAGE 2] Influencer and fashion designer Alanoud Badr and Ashley Cadzow from Sunday agency With dynamic, business-minded millennials on social media thought to have the greatest potential reach when it comes to influencing the purchases of young people the MENA region, who are no longer affected by traditional television or print advertising. For Saudi Arabian fashion designer Alanoud Badr it’s all about impact, and that’s what she’s made for more than a decade. First, with her style blog which pushed boundaries in the kingdom early on, and then with the UAE-based clothing label Lady Fozaza which she set up in 2011. [IME S02E26 MAIN ARTICLE – SECONDARY IMAGE 3] Caption: Euronews reporter Salim Essaid takes a selfie with Alanoud Badr amongst her brand’s signature blazers It was her petite size that first pushed her to developed the brand’s signature blazers with their frame-enhancing shoulders. The design quickly attracted the attention of celebrities like Lady Gaga and Kim Kardashian, along with nearly 750 thousand Instagram (link: https://www.instagram.com/fozaza/) followers. [IME S02E26 MAIN ARTICLE – SECONDARY IMAGE 4] Lady Gaga and Kim Kardashian wearing Lady Fozaza An issue some big brands face is hiring influencers with large followings but low engagement, including fake accounts, or so-called inactive, ghost accounts. Labels became interested in hiring Badr to sell their products when drilling down into the quality of her followers and their level of engagement. “Do you know if she has a special bond with those followers? Because if she does, whatever she speaks about will resonate,” she explains. “They will take it in and they will react to it. That’s the money’s worth.” SEEN ON SOCIAL: INFLUENCER STYLE Abu Dhabi influencer Dana shared this look of the day, saying she finds it awesome to be a modest and modern UAE influencer. View this post on Instagram So confused with the weather these days ?? A post shared by Dana (@dee4dana) on Mar 28, 2019 at 4:30am PDT

Simi and Adekunle Gold are the Absolute Cutest In Their New Music Video 'By You'

OkayAfrica  

​The couple are giving us all the feels in their latest music video.

South Africa: Constitutional Court to Rule On Public Protector, SA Reserve Bank Matter

allAfrica  

[News24Wire] The Constitutional Court will rule on Monday in the matter between Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane and the SA Reserve Bank (SARB), a tweet from the country's apex court read on Friday.

Giannis Antetokounmpo's 'Coming To America'-Inspired Nike Sneaker Will Be Dropping Very Soon

OkayAfrica  

​The Nigerian-Greek NBA MVP is releasing a limited edition run of his Nike collab, 'Zoom Freak 1.'

Durban International film festival underway

Africanews  

African films were the focus at the 2019 Durban International Film Festival which opened on Thursday, July 18. Created in 1978, the Durban International Film Festival is considered the first of South Africa’s film festivals. Its a full house at the DurbanICC for the opening film screening of #knucklecity #diff2019 #diff40 pic.twitter.com/H3kFOdO6pP— Durban International Film Festival (DIFFest) July 18, 2019 This year, the organizers are determined to tell the story of their continent through the arts. “We felt it was time for our African voices to be heard, for our stories to be told from our own perspective. We have been lagging behind the Western world and we thought that this was the moment when we regain power. So we want to unite as a continent to be stronger and bring the strength of the industry to the world”, said Chipo Zhou, Manager of the Durban International Film Festival. For stakeholders the platform is crucial for the growth African storytelling. “Festivals like the DIFF are very important in this country. Not only in this country, but also in the development of African storytelling. There are so many unpublished stories on the continent, in South Africa. And it is festivals like this that highlight our stories and make them known to the world”, said South African actress, Minnie Dlamini- Jones. Nearly 300 films from all over the world will be screened. With an estimated audience of nearly 30,000 viewers, the festival gives pride to African cinema, despite the lack of huge budgets. Desiree Kahikopo is a Namibian Film Director and producer. “People are a little reluctant to believe and invest in African cinema. So the main thing is the funding, but apart from that, we have the stories, we have the talent, it’s just access to that funding that’s the challenge for most of the people I’ve talked to”, Kahikopo noted. The Durban International Film Festival began on Thursday July 18 and will end on Sunday July 28. AFP Photo Credit: Durban International Film Festival

Africa: 2019 DELTAS Africa Scientific Conference. - Interview of Aminatou Kone, a post-Doc fellow of MARCAD

allAfrica  

[allAfrica] This conferece "was also a platform for this young generation to express their views about how they perceive the future of science in Africa. We will leave here with new motivations and more opportunities."

South Africa corruption inquiry: Zuma to cooperate with written statements

Africanews  

Zuma to continue cooperation Following a meeting with the commission chair, Zondo said the former president had agreed to continue cooperating with the inquiry via his legal team by providing written statements. “It is contemplated within this agreement that at a certain stage the former president will come back and give evidence,” said Zonda, who then adjourned Friday’s hearing. July 19: Zuma’s lawyers suspend cooperation President Jacob Zuma’s legal team told the corruption inquiry on Friday that their client would not take part in the inquiry further because he felt that he was being questioned unfairly. “Chair, we are here today to say we will take no further part in these proceedings,” lawyer Muzi Sikhakhane told the inquiry. He said Zuma had been subject to ‘relentless cross-examination’ and is being obliged to answer questions put to him by the commission evidence leader Paul Pretorius, yet he was ‘not called in line with any rules’. The former president was invited to offer clarity on the statements made by former ministers and senior government officials which implicated him in the capture of the state. Following Zuma’s withdrawal from the commission proceedings, the chair, deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo emphasised the fact that the decision to call Zuma before the commission was his decision and his alone. “I, therefore, do not want Mr Pretorius or the commission’s legal team to be criticised for that decision. I made it alone. I believe it was a correct decision and still believe it was a correct decision.” Zuma cries foul South Africa’s deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo on Wednesday adjourned until Friday morning a public inquiry into state corruption, after lawyers Zuma’s lawyers said he was being questioned unfairly. Zuma’s lawyers have argued that the inquiry’s lawyers should not cross-examine the former president because they say evidence given by other witnesses does not directly implicate Zuma in corruption and fraud. “Chair I hear you, and I appreciate what you’re saying, but I’m really being cross-examined very thoroughly on the details. And I don’t know how come,” Zuma told the chairman of the inquiry. Zuma’s lawyers told Zondo that the former president, who has been testifying since Monday, had been brought to the inquiry under “false pretences” because he was being cross-examined, whereas he thought he would only have to answer straightforward points of clarity. “The former president has expressed certain concerns,” Zondo said. “It has been decided that we should adjourn the proceedings for the day, and we should not sit tomorrow in order to give a full opportunity to the commission’s legal team and the former president’s legal team … to see whether a way can be found in which his (Zuma’s) concerns are addressed.” July 17: Zuma denies interfering in Transnet deal on Day 3 Former president Jacob Zuma on Wednesday denied having interfered with the appointment of a chief executive at transport and infrastructure company Transnet, during his third day testifying at a corruption inquiry. Transnet, which operates railways, ports and fuel pipelines, is one of a handful of state-owned firms that became embroiled in corruption scandals during Zuma’s tenure. Former public enterprises minister Barbara Hogan told the inquiry that Zuma had told her at a meeting in 2009 that Siyabonga Gama was his “only choice” to be CEO of Transnet. Gama was at the time subject to disciplinary proceedings because of procurement irregularities, and Hogan said Transnet’s board of directors wanted to appoint another candidate it deemed better qualified for the job. Asked whether he had told Hogan that Gama was his only choice for Transnet CEO, Zuma told the inquiry: “It couldn’t be like that, we don’t work like that. As I say there was a process. … I would have been undermining the process.” Gama eventually became Transnet CEO in 2015 and was involved in allegedly corrupt contracts worth tens of billions of rands to procure locomotives. Gama, who was fired last year after trying unsuccessfully to halt his removal, was not available for comment. He has denied the allegations against him. A Gupta-linked firm earned huge consulting fees from the locomotives deal. The Guptas, who left South Africa around the time Zuma was ousted, have consistently denied having looted state firms like Transnet. Transnet has sought to recover via the courts money it says was misspent under Gama’s leadership. State prosecutors have said they are following the inquiry and they could open cases if sufficient evidence of wrongdoing emerges. Day 2 of Zuma’s testimony South Africa’s ex-president Jacob Zuma on Tuesday said he had received a death threat after his testimony the previous day to an inquiry on corruption. Appearing for the second day at the commision of inquiry into state capture, Zuma said his personal assistant received a phone call late on Monday from an unknown caller threatening to kill Zuma and his children. The country’s deputy chief justice, Raymond Zondo, who is overseeing the inquiry, said the threats were unacceptable. There was no immediate comment from the police. Zuma’s lawyers then argued that the inquiry’s line of questioning was inappropriate because it amounted to cross-examination. This led to a brief delay before the presiding judge urged those questioning Zuma to bear this in mind. Zuma’s lawyers said the testimony at the inquiry so far had not implicated the former president in corruption or fraud, so he should not be cross-examined but should merely answer questions for clarification purposes. When proceedings finally kicked off, Zuma was asked about an incident where one of the Indian-born Guptas allegedly offered former ANC lawmaker Vytjie Mentor the position of minister of public enterprises. Zuma replied saying; “I know nothing about it”, repeating the same phrase several times and once letting out a chuckle. Mentor told the inquiry that the offer of the ministerial post was conditional on her canceling a lucrative South African Airways flying route to India. She said she refused the offer, which she said was made in 2010 at a time when Zuma was at one of the Guptas’ residences. “No there was nothing of that nature. I was never in some room,” Zuma said when asked whether he was in the Guptas’ home when the job offer was allegedly made to Mentor. Zuma, 77, said he had never discussed ministerial appointments with the Guptas. Several witnesses other than Mentor have told the inquiry that the Guptas were privy to information about senior government appointments. He however confirmed he had met the Gupta brothers to discuss the New Age, the newspaper that he had encouraged them to set up in 2010. Asked whether he met with the Guptas over the newspaper project, he replied: “From time to time they briefed me.” “They were just briefing me on progress they were making in establishing that business, the newspaper, not the financing,” he said. Zuma denied that he knew about alleged harassment of civil servants by Gupta executives demanding that the government’s advertising budget was spent with the newspaper. Zuma also denied on Tuesday that he had issued an instruction to remove Themba Maseko, former head of the government communications service, from his position after Maseko refused to direct state advertising money to the Guptas’ media company in 2011. Zuma, expected to testify until Friday, was supported at the inquiry by his son as well as prominent allies including ex-finance minister Malusi Gigaba. ANC Secretary General Ace Magashule, a close ally of Zuma, addressed reporters during a break in the proceedings on Tuesday and suggested the inquiry’s focus on the Gupta family was misguided. Magashule, who is in charge of the day-to-day running of the ANC, has made comments that have directly contradicted Ramaphosa and his faction in the ANC in recent months. “I don’t know why South Africa is not actually investigating every company which has worked with government, and why we are actually targeting one particular company and family,” Magashule said. “Tell me which company has not met with government.” Magashule declined to answer a question about whether he thought the inquiry was biased, as Zuma’s lawyers have said. July 16: Day 1 of Zuma’s testimony South Africa’s ex-president, Jacob Zuma on Monday defended himself at the commision of inquiry into state capture, where he is accused of having presided over a corrupt government. Over the past year, this commission, chaired by the Vice-President of the Constitutional Court Raymond Zondo, has heard from dozens of ministers, elected officials, businessmen and senior civil servants who have come to expose the shady cases of the Zuma era (2009-2018). The former head of state, 77, is suspected of illegally granting lucrative public contracts and undue advantages to a sulfurous family of Indian businessmen with whom he is close, the Gupta. July 15: Zuma’s testimony Zuma told the inquiry that there was a conspiracy against him and that his enemies had subjected him to a “character assassination” because they wanted him out of power. “This commission, from my understanding, was really created to have me coming here, and perhaps to find things on me,” Zuma said in his opening remarks at the inquiry, looking relaxed and wearing a dark suit. “There has been a drive to remove me from the scene, a wish that I should disappear.” About his controversial links to the Gupta family, Zuma said he had never broken the law with them, describing the businessmen at the centre of an influence-peddling scandal as friends. “I never did anything with them (the Guptas) unlawfully, they just remained friends. … Never, never did I discuss any matter that does not belong to them,” Zuma told the inquiry. “They were businesspeople and successful businesspeople,” Zuma continued, referring to the three Gupta brothers. “I’m not a businessperson, I know nothing about business, I’m a politician, I know something about politics.” He said he could trace this to the early 1990s, when he received an intelligence report that two foreign intelligence agencies and a branch of the apartheid government that was in power at the time had come up with a strategy to get rid of him. He did not name where the foreign intelligence agencies came from, only that they were from “big countries”. “They (my enemies) took a decision that Zuma must be removed from the decision-making structures of the ANC. That’s why the character assassination, that is the beginning of the process that has put me where I am today,” Zuma said. Zuma also hinted that he could spill the beans on ANC comrades who had spoken out against him. “I’ve been respectful to comrades, maybe I’ve reached a point where that must take a back seat.” .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Jacob Zuma was forced by his successor, Cyril Ramaphosa, to resign a year and a half ago at the head of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) and the country. But he has always denied that he was involved in all the scandals that have splashed his reign. Reactions to Zuma’s testimony Asked about Zuma’s comments, ANC spokesman Pule Mabe said the party would give the inquiry space to do its work. “The ANC is not on trial here,” Mabe said. Natasha Mazzone, a senior lawmaker with the opposition Democratic Alliance party, said Zuma was trying to whitewash serious allegations. “The fact that we’ve heard a conspiracy theory dating back to 1990 is proof that the real truth is going to take a long time to extract,” Mazzone said. Rudie Heyneke from the Organisation Undoing Tax Abuse said the inquiry could find it difficult to pin much on Zuma because he had “always been careful to stay a layer or two away from the action”. Reservations from Zuma’s lawyers In a letter made public last month, his lawyer Daniel Mantsha questioned the impartiality of the commission of inquiry by accusing it of seeking “only one truth” and wanting to “trap and humiliate” his client. Although he did not obtain the list of questions that Judge Zondo plans to ask him, Jacob Zuma agreed to respond to his non-binding summons, in principle until Friday, July 19. But there is still doubt about the attitude he will adopt at the hearing, which will be broadcast live on television. “The committee asked me to come and testify and provide it with any information I may have in my possession,” Zuma told the press this week. “I’m going to go and we’ll see how things turn out.” The case against Zuma Since it launched its hearings, the Zondo Commission has compiled a thick case against the former president. A former minister, Mcebisi Jonas, came to tell how the Gupta brothers had come to offer him in 2015 the morocco Finance in exchange for his help in obtaining contracts and a bribe of 600 million rand (nearly 40 million euros). According to Mr. Jonas, Ajay Gupta then told that “You have to understand that we control everything (...) and that the old man (Zuma) will do whatever he tells us to do”. Another Finance Minister, Nhlanhla Nene, testified that he was thanked the same year by Jacob Zuma for refusing a lucrative nuclear contract project that would have benefited the same Gupta brothers, owners of a uranium mine. In turn, the current Minister of Public Enterprises Pravin Gordhan also settled his accounts with Jacob Zuma, accusing him of having “allowed a climate of impunity allowing corruption” and the “capture of the State” by private interests. Gordhan has estimated that 100 billion rand (€6 billion) of public funds have been diverted in recent years in his country. The main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA), has been a long-time critic of the turpitudes of the Zuma regime and welcomed its hearing. “There can be no immunity for Jacob Zuma,” said MP Natasha Mazzone, “he must be held accountable for his role in capturing the state. Despite all the accusations against him, the former president has still not been formally charged. He is currently being prosecuted in only one case involving bribes paid on the margins of an arms contract signed… twenty years ago. In defence of Zuma Zuma still has allies and a group of several dozen supporters broke into clapping and chants of “Zuma” as he entered the hearing room. Outside, supporters wearing military clothing emblazoned with the emblem of the former armed wing of the ANC shouted: “Hands off Zuma!” One of them, Bongani Nkosi, said he thought the inquiry was out to get Zuma and that he had enemies because he supported radical economic policies to help poor black people. Ramaphosa, Zuma’s former deputy, has made sweeping personnel changes in government and state-owned companies as part of an effort to curb corruption and revive the stagnant economy. But he has been hampered by the lingering influence that Zuma and his allies exert over the ANC’s top decision-making bodies, as well as by the scale of the problems he inherited. Zuma, expected to give testimony to the inquiry from Monday to Friday, has also been in court on several occasions over the past year to answer corruption charges linked to a deal to buy military hardware for the armed forces in the 1990s. The inquiry is a rare example of an African leader being brought to book soon after losing power. Agencies

Tensions in Ethiopia's southern Hawassa city claim 3 lives, injure dozens

Africanews  

Tensions are high in the Ethiopian southern city of Hawassa where hospital authorities said on Friday that at least three people have died amid a showdown between state security forces and some local activists who want to declare a new region for their Sidama ethnic group. The threat of large-scale violence in Hawassa city centre on Thursday was largely averted after a Sidama opposition party agreed to delay declaring their own region and accept a government offer to hold a referendum in five months. The threat to unilaterally declare a new region was a direct challenge to the authority of the Ethiopian federal government, which oversees nine regions in the nation of 105 million people. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, appointed by the ruling coalition last year, has been widely praised for political reforms in what was once one of the continent’s most repressive nations. But many Ethiopian activists are now using their greater freedoms to demand more rights, sometimes for their own ethnic groups. At least eight other ethnic groups beside the Sidama also want their own regions. The tensions sometimes spark violence. Adamant activists In Hawassa, not all Sidama people accepted the decision to delay the declaration. Some activists were still on the streets on Friday and most shops were still closed. Local police told Fana Broadcasting that relative peace prevailed in Hawassa and nearby areas and they are working to restore peace in areas affected by the violence. “Efforts are underway to put under control the violence which started in Hawassa and later spread to the neighboring Sidama woredas (district),” regional state Police Commissioner Tewodros Woldemichael told Fana. Police arrested individuals who took part in the violence that resulted in loss of life and properties, according to Fana. Hawassa Referral Hospital has received 12 injured civilians in the last two days, three of whom died, said general manager Zinaw Serniso. Some had fractured bones after being hit with batons and others had been shot, he said. One man shot in the head died on Thursday, and two more shot in the leg and abdomen died on their way to the hospital on Friday, he said. “The decision by top Sidama administrators to accept a belated referendum meant the zone didn’t self-declare and so a major confrontation was avoided yesterday,” said William Davison, an analyst from Brussels-based International Crisis Group. “But that decision was not accepted by all of the youthful activists, who complained they were not consulted and were further angered when security forces prevented public meetings being held to discuss the situation.” Organised groups in towns outside Hawassa are ransacking houses, business and also robbing people, said Million Tumato, president of the opposition Sidama Liberation Movement. He confirmed three civilians had been killed in Hawassa and said 15 others had been killed in outlying areas. Reuters could not immediately confirm the deaths or the circumstances surrounding them. “At this moment, we cannot calm our people,” he said. REUTERS

Video: Is poverty in Africa man made?

Africanews  

This year as the world marks the historic strive of an African hero, Nelson Mandela, on the theme action against poverty; Africanews Hawa Suleiman Brimah interrogates efforts towards poverty alleviation in Africa. Is poverty in Africa man made? Watch documentary film.

Ashburn Update