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Somalia: UN Envoy Urges 'Deepened' Political Consensus

allAfrica  

[UN News] The "broad political consensus" reached in September that ended a two-year stalemate in Somalia must be "preserved and indeed deepened", the country's UN envoy told the Security Council on Monday.

Ethiopia: Govt Says Its Forces Have Closed On Tigray Capital After Ultimatum

allAfrica  

[DW] The Ethiopian government said it has surrounded Tigray's regional capital, but the dissident TPLF has denied the reports. The three-week conflict has destabilized both Ethiopia and the wider region.

A South African village, a murder and a coal mine

BBC News Africa  

Was the brutal shooting of a woman linked to her campaign against an opencast mine?

Zimbabwe: How to Fix the Turmoil in Zim's Mining Sector

allAfrica  

[ICG] The executive summary of the ICG's new report, "All That Glitters is Not Gold - Turmoil in Zimbabwe's Mining Sector":

Ntabo Ntaberi: DR Congo militia leader jailed for crimes against humanity

BBC News Africa  

A military court jails Ntabo Ntaberi for life after a two-year trial that saw 178 victims testify.

Ex-Sierra Leonean president questioned over graft probe

Africanews  

The former head of state of Sierra Leone Ernest Bai Koroma was questioned Monday by a commission investigating alleged corruption and embezzlement committed during his presidency, two officials have said on condition of anonymity. Koroma, 67, was questioned at a secret location after his hearing was cancelled twice for security reasons, a commission member said. A member of Koroma's office confirmed the hearing without further comment. Several former Koroma administration officials have already been arrested as part of the fight against corruption and waste of public funds launched by his successor, President Julius Maada Bio, who has promised to recover tens of millions of dollars that have disappeared. In March, a commission of inquiry concluded that millions of dollars remained unaccounted for after reviewing the accounts of ministries and state-owned enterprises, dating back to Koroma's years in office between 2007 and 2018. Like Koroma, some 130 prominent figures linked to his regime are banned from leaving the country.

Ex-Bafana Bafana star killed in crash

Africanews  

Anele Ngcongca , a former South Africa defender who played for the host team at the 2010 World Cup, died in a car crash early Monday. He was 33. The South African government said Ngcongca died in the crash in the Kwazulu-Natal province. South African media reports said he was a passenger in the car and the driver, a woman, was in the hospital in critical condition. She was not identified. Ngcongca played for South Africa from 2009 to 2016. He made 53 appearances for Bafana Bafana and was a member of the team when South Africa hosted the 2010 World Cup. He played in Europe from 2007 to 2016, winning a league title and the Belgian Cup twice with  Racing Genk .  In 2015, he joined Troyes AC in France on a season-long loan.  Ngcongca's current club, Mamelodi Sundowns , offered condolences to his family and friends. The defender  was on loan at Kwazulu-Natal-based club AmaZulu at the time of his death.

These Images Will Show You Life in the DRC in 2020

AfricaDotcom  

The 11th Carmignac photojournalism award is dedicated to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)...

The Lot of North Africa’s Political Cartoonists isn’t an Easy One

AfricaDotcom  

In their native countries, many of these artistic activists’ face censorship, persecution, imprisonment or worse,...

Kenya’s Innovative Data Centers

AfricaDotcom  

With cloud computing and bandwidth needs soaring across Africa, providing faster connectivity for users and...

House Hunting in Africa Made Easier

AfricaDotcom  

Seso Global, a one-stop platform for property management and transactions that began life in Nigeria,...

Rwanda’s Ongoing Refugee-Evacuation Efforts

Africanews  

African Solidarity in the Time of Crisis In the country’s most recent efforts to contribute to the persistent issue of displaced persons within the African continent, Rwanda welcomed around 79 more people who arrived at the capital Kigali on November 19. All hailing from East Africa — with 42 being Sudanese, 33 Eritrean and four Somali, the 11 women and 68 men had been stranded in Libya and were made to take Covid-19 tests upon their arrival in Rwanda. Elise Villechalane, the spokesperson for the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in Rwanda told The EastAfrican, "The situation there is quite difficult, there are still thousands of people stranded in Libya, estimated to 45,000 of whom a great number are in detention centres." Efforts Continue Despite the Pandemic These refugees and asylum seekers will be hosted at the Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM) centre in Bugesera district which is situated around 60km from the capital city and are the fourth group of migrants to be received by Rwanda since the country signed the Memorandum of Understanding last year. An agreement signed on September 10, 2019, between Rwanda, the African Union and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to move refugees and asylum seekers out of detention facilities in Libya. Upon signing, Rwanda received the first group of displaced persons in Kigali shortly afterwards on September 26, 2019. However, the initiative has since seen some temporary setbacks as movement into Rwanda was halted earlier this year in light of the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic and consequential travel restrictions. According to the Minister of Cabinet Affairs, Solange Kayisire, around 306 displaced persons have been received at the ETM in Rwanda, "121 persons have been resettled so far, 98 and 23 to Sweden and Canada, respectively. On December 2 and 3 this year, a group of 33 people at ETM will also depart to Sweden.”

US VP Harris Echoes Black Girl Magic Among African Women

Africanews  

Gratitude Towards Black female Voters Amid numerous speculations around African-US relations and questions about how the energy and approach towards the African continent could shift under a newly-victorious Biden-Harris administration, it appears that the United States Vice-President-elect, Kamala Harris, chose to kick things off on a positive and hopeful note. Upon her election win announcement on November 7 as the first-ever woman, woman of African descent and also woman of Asian descent to occupy the prestigious position of Vice-President in the history of the United States, Kamala Harris gave an inspirational speech in which she made a point to highlight the collective efforts of black women - many times at the start and often at the heart, of every social justice movement. Empowering Afro Women The accomplished and history-making politician of both Jamaican and Indian heritage also gave special mention to female immigrants and the work they put in to make something positive of themselves and their communities. A heartfelt message that echoes a historical pattern that can be seen throughout the years amongst women of African descent — in the Diaspora and naturally, on the African continent. African women continent-wide and in the Diaspora felt inspired by Harris' impassioned speech as many took as a reminder to keep lifting their black female voices within their communities worldwide. Former African development consultant of a South African and Zimbabwean cultural background, QONDI, appeared even more impassioned for social change within her tweet. While another Twitter user of African descent expressed her elation at what this win could mean for so many Afro women worldwide who see themselves in VP-Elect Harris as a black woman whose success was born of an immigrant experience. Past and Future Female African Leaders Although the Western media often disproportionately pays attention to the various expressions of Patriarchy in African countries — a phenomenon that is also very much prevalent the world over, the African continent is home to the world’s oldest expressions of empowered women.  African history sees female  heads of ancient kingdoms with more recent examples being Angola's Queen Ana Nzinga in the 16th century, the Dahomey Kingdom female warriors in the 17th that inspired the globally-successful movie 'Black Panther,' Ghana's Queen Yaa Asantewaa in the 1920s and even feminist movements such as the Aba Women's Riot by Igbo women in Nigeria in the 1920swhose activism would be both current and true even today. In addition, Africa already boasts several female heads of state such  Slyvie Kiningi the Acting President of Burundi (February – October 1993),  Ellen Johnson Sirleaf the President of Liberia (January 2006 – January 2018) and  Sahle-Work Zewde the President of Ethiopia (October 2018 – Present). Even as such, US VP-Elect Harris' win in the US, a country which many people on the continent still view — interestingly enough, as a model of modern democracy , could perhaps further inspire even more African women and girls to live out their political aspirations towards the betterment of their communities.

Life After al-Shabaab

AfricaDotcom  

Somali militant group al-Shabaab recruits thousands of foot soldiers, but also needs people to provide...

Inside a Tigray town scarred by Ethiopian conflict

Africanews  

A pair of burnt-out tanks now signals the entrance to the Tigray town of Humera, where the streets are lined with rubble and residents remain in shock after an Ethiopian army assault earlier this month. The conflict between Ethiopia's federal government and the leaders of the northern Tigray region arrived quickly in the farming town, with artillery barrages bombarding commercial buildings and homes as residents fled or cowered in terror. A communications blackout and restrictions have made reporting on the conflict difficult, but AFP journalists reached Tigray -- the first independent journalists to report from inside the conflict zone since fighting started -- and found the scars of conflict everywhere. "We didn't expect shelling," said Humera resident Getachew Berhane, a short, bald 42-year-old in a crisp yellow t-shirt. "Suddenly, we started to hear war weapons, explosions, and then people panicked." "I couldn't leave my house. I was terrified," he said, as an Ethiopian government official accompanying the AFP team listened in. The Ethiopian army, battling forces loyal to the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF), declared Humera "liberated" on November 12 after heavy clashes in the first days of the conflict. - Bombs 'from the north' - The power lines remain cut in Humera, a low-slung town of pastel-painted concrete buildings that was -- until recently -- home to around 30,000 people. A gaping hole has been punched through the brick facade of the prominent Hotel Africa, while other structures have been peppered with bullet holes and gouged by shrapnel. In the city centre, soldiers lolled on plastic chairs beneath the shade of trees. Elsewhere, the city's remaining residents huddled around televisions run on diesel generators as military vehicles and tractors drove the cobbled and paved roads. The town lies near Ethiopia's borders with Sudan and Eritrea. Many of Humera's residents were among the first of the more than 30,000 Ethiopians who have fled into eastern Sudan for safety, leaving the city feeling abandoned. Multiple people told AFP that during the battle they witnessed mortar bombs whistling in "from the north", meaning Eritrea. Ethiopia's government denies TPLF claims that Eritrea is involved in the fighting, but acknowledges making use of Eritrean territory. - 'Hand-to-mouth living' - At one tin-roofed residential compound,two women and an elderly man were killed reportedly by shelling and gunfire. Two injured women still lay recovering from their wounds weeks later, strapped to makeshift stretchers. A crossroads town in Ethiopia's far northwest, a hot, dry, agricultural lowland, Humera promised prosperity before the start of the conflict. "This town was on the verge of development," said Tewodros Gebreselassie, a grim-faced, grey-bearded sesame trader. "But now it's been brought back to hand-to-mouth living because of an unnecessary war." Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed -- last year's Nobel Peace Prize winner -- announced military operations in Tigray on November 4, saying they were in response to TPLF attacks on federal army camps. Hundreds are believed to have died since, while tens of thousands have fled their homes. The intense fighting has rolled eastwards, into the mountainous highlands and towards the regional capital Mekele, a city of half a million. On Sunday, Abiy gave TPLF leaders 72 hours to surrender ahead of a threatened all-out assault on Mekele. - Outsiders move in - With fighting having subsided in the west of Tigray, government officials are seeking to reimpose order in Humera. The strategy appears to be to erase TPLF control partly by bringing administrators in from the neighbouring Amhara region, a move that risks inflaming ethnic tensions. Throughout much of the west, federal soldiers are scarcely seen, instead security is maintained by Amhara's uniformed "special forces". Civil servants have also arrived from Amhara to take over the administration of some Tigrayan towns and cities. Daniel Wubet, an Amhara tourism official in a tracksuit and vest said he was in Humera to oversee "peacekeeping", procure basic necessities for the population and "educate" them on the TPLF's bad deeds. Daniel, who had a Kalashnikov slung from his shoulder, has co-opted some local Tigrayans into the rebuilding exercise, among them Tewodros. "They said I haven't done anything wrong and that I'm a pure Ethiopian," Tewodros explained of his appointment. The presence of Amhara officials and soldiers will fuel fears of an occupation among Tigrayans, who are mired in a decades-old dispute over land that has, in the past, sparked violent clashes and continues to be a dangerous flashpoint. Abrehu Fentahum, an elderly Amhara farmer living in western Tigray, said he looked forward to the land being returned to Amhara control, even though Daniel and others stress that this is not their goal. "As long as I can remember, this land belonged to Amhara," until 1991 when "it was taken by the TPLF," he said. Already, visible traces of the TPLF are being expunged, its banners replaced by the green, yellow and red imperial-era flag of Amhara nationalism that now flies high at checkpoints and town squares. These symbols will not allay Tigrayan fears of occupation, nor will the word "Amhara" scrawled on shuttered storefronts like a hastily graffitied claim of ownership. Speaking to journalists by text message, TPLF leader Debretsion Gebremichael warned the presence of Amhara administrators and fighters would only prolong the conflict. "This is one of their evil plans to weaken Tigray," he said. "We'll continue to fight until they are cleared from all places."

The Thorn in Uganda’s Ruling and Opposition Parties’ Side

AfricaDotcom  

Just three weeks into his official campaign for the Ugandan presidency, Ugandan musician and parliamentarian...

Fifa Bans Caf President

AfricaDotcom  

Confederation of African Football (Caf) president Ahmad has been banned for five years by Fifa...

Africa’s Biggest Economy is in Recession for the First Time since 2016

AfricaDotcom  

Nigeria has slipped into a recession after its gross domestic product contracted for the second...

A Scramble to Contain the Situation in Ethiopia

AfricaDotcom  

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed on Sunday called on the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF)...

Mogadishu Braces itself for a Severe Weather Beating

AfricaDotcom  

The strongest tropical cyclone ever measured in the northern Indian Ocean has made landfall in...

Ethiopia's Tigray crisis: Debretsion Gebremichael vows to fight on

BBC News Africa  

Debretsion Gebremichael says people are "ready to die" to defend the region despite calls to surrender.

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