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Africa Top10 Lifestyle & Travel News

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Thebe Magugu Wins the 2019 LVMH Prize In a first for Africa, South African fashion designer Thebe Magugu has won the prestigious LVMH prize, which bestows serious funding and mentorship for emerging talents. Designers selected – amongst them, Nigerian designer Kenneth Ize, British designer Bethany Williams or Hed Mayner from Israel – had to present …

Zimbabwe: Mugabe Leaves Behind Mixed Legacy

allAfrica  

[VOA] Former Zimbabwean leader Robert Mugabe, who died in a Singapore hospital Friday at age 95, leaves behind a complicated legacy. To some, he was a liberation hero who stood by his principles. Others say he rigged elections, destroyed the economy of what was once Africa's breadbasket and terrorized his people for decades.

Mozambique: Pope Wraps Up 3-Day, 3-Theme Tour

allAfrica  

[VOA] Three words resonated like a refrain during Pope Francis' tour of Mozambique this week: hope, peace and reconciliation. Tens of thousands of faithful from across the continent packed a stadium Friday to hear that message and take it with them.

Sudan: As Sudan Rebuilds Government, Flood Victims Rebuild Towns

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[VOA] As Sudan awaits formation of a new government following a landmark political deal, hundreds of thousands of houses across the country remain under water.

Ethiopia: Aid Groups Suspend Work After 2 Killed

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[VOA] Humanitarian aid efforts by the United Nations and other groups have been suspended in Ethiopia's Gambella regional state after the deaths of two aid workers there, a local U.N. official said Friday.

South Africa: After a Week of Xenophobic Attacks, Govt Grapples for Answers

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[VOA] Zerihun Tabo, an Ethiopian shopkeeper, surveyed the wreckage of his neighborhood store in Johannesburg, South Africa, this week, after looters pillaged it.

How Many Languages of Africa Are There?

AfricaDotcom  

Not only is Africa the second most populous continent in the world with over one billion people, but it is also home to the highest linguistic div

Robert Mugabe granted national hero status and official mourning

BBC News Africa  

Days of national mourning commence in Zimbabwe for its controversial former leader.

Big Saturday Read: The death of Robert Mugabe

This Is Africa  

When all is said and done, the life of Mugabe is not amenable to a whole number.

South Africa's Caster Semenya to play football in 2020

Africanews  

South Africa’s star athlete Caster Semenya on Friday announced she would be playing football with women’s club JVW FC in 2020. The double Olympic champion will not be able to defend her 800 metres title at the world championships later this month after the Swiss Federal Tribunal reversed a ruling that temporarily lifted testosterone regulations imposed on her. Her latest move suggests that Semenya could potentially be preparing for a career outside of athletics. “I’m grateful for this opportunity and I appreciate the love and support I already get from the team. I’m looking forward to this new journey and hopefully I can contribute as much as I can to the club,” Semenya said in a statement on JVW’s website. Although Semenya will not be registered for the current SAFA Sasol League season, she will continue to train with JVW in preparation for a 2020 debut in the country’s top tier. The 28-year-old athlete is appealing the Court of Arbitration for Sport’s ruling that supported regulations introduced by the sport’s governing body, the IAAF. Time to showcase football skills South Africa women’s captain Janine van Wyk, who owns the club, said she was delighted to have signed Semenya who took part in a practice session on Tuesday. “I am absolutely honoured that out of all the other women’s clubs around the world, she has chosen JVW as the club where she would like to start showcasing her football skills,” she said. “I look forward to her working with Coach Ciara (Picco) and our first team where I’m sure she will sharpen up and get ready to play in 2020.” Semenya is not the first athlete in recent times to try to kick-start a soccer career, with Olympic sprint champion Usain Bolt securing a trial at Australian outfit Central Coast Mariners last year. READ MORE: Usain Bolt impresses football fans with first professional goals REUTERS

‘Something is deeply wrong with our society’

This Is Africa  

South Africa is a wounded nation, and its people carry with them deep pain and extreme anger, the (UCT) chancellor, Mrs Graça Machel, told mourners

Brexit: Johnson suffers three defeats

Africanews  

British prime minister Boris Johnson has lost three key parliamentary votes in less than 24 hours. Johnson’s strategy to wrench Britain out of the EU by the end of next month is clearly in tatters. Meanwhile, Iran has increased pressure on European signatories to the historic 2015 nuclear pact scaling back commitments under the agreement. Also, Hungary misuses more European Union funds than any other country, claims a new report from the European Anti-Fraud Office. Stay tuned as we will have reports on this and other stories as we retrace the major current events covered by the Euronews editorial team. elayneshani

“The list of Mugabe’s crimes is endless”

This Is Africa  

here are four personal stories by GroundUp’s Zimbabwean reporters that show what Robert Mugabe meant, not only to them, but many Zimbabweans.

Pope Francis blasts corrupt leaders in Mozambique, welcomed in Madagascar

Africanews  

Pope arrives in Madagascar The pope arrived in Madagascar on Friday evening, for the second leg of his tour. A short video of the children who welcomed Pope Francis in Madagascar. Am extremely beautiful country, Madagascar is also extremely poor, with a GDP per capita of $1,600 a year. pic.twitter.com/ssBHs22CT9— Ines San Martin (@inesanma) September 6, 2019 His trip here is anticipated by many, including conservationists who hope the environmentally-conscious spiritual leader will spotlight the island that lost 2% of primary rainforest last year, the highest of any tropical nation according to the World Resources Institute. “He should say that this forest is God’s creation. He gave it to us and for our own benefit,” said Anselme Toto Volahy, researcher from Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. “If we don’t manage it well, we will destroy ourselves.” Pope’s final messages to Mozambicans On his final day in Mozambique, Pope Francis on Friday scolded political and business leaders in the resource-rich but poor East African country who allow themselves to be corrupted by outsiders. “Mozambique is a land of abundant natural and cultural riches, yet paradoxically, great numbers of its people live below the poverty level,” Francis said in the stadium, in an area of the capital where many people live in shantytowns with houses of corrugated metal roofs. The pope visited a hospital for HIV-AIDS sufferers run by the Sant’ Egidio community and then said a mass for some 60,000 of people in Maputo’s national stadium. “At times it seems that those who approach with the alleged desire to help have other interests. Sadly, this happens with brothers and sisters of the same land, who let themselves be corrupted. It is very dangerous to think that this is the price to be paid for foreign aid,” Francis said. While the pope did not give any specific examples of corruption, Mozambique is still struggling to recover from the impact of a $2 billion debt scandal, which saw hundreds of millions of dollars in borrowing guaranteed by the Mozambique government disappear. The head of the Catholic Church also told tens of thousands of faithful at the packed stadium not to resort to “vengeance” “We cannot think of the future and build a nation” with violence, the pope said in a homily to a crowd of about 60,000 at the Zimpeto stadium in the Mozambican capital Maputo. Speaking in Portuguese, he asked them not to follow the old law of retaliation “an eye for eye, a tooth for a tooth. “No family, no group of neighbours or ethnic group and even less no country has a future if the motor that unites them… is composed of vengeance and hatred,” he said. September 05: Pope addresses politicians On his first full day in Mozambique, Pope Francis applauded a recently signed peace deal between government and rebels. The pontiff’s visit comes after the government and the former rebel group Renamo, now the main opposition party, signed a historic treaty. The two sides in the former Portuguese colony fought a 15-year civil war that ended in 1992 and killed about a million people. But only last month did they sign a permanent ceasefire. In talks with President Filipe Nyusi, the pope expressed his “personal gratitude… for the efforts made in recent decades to ensure that peace is once more the norm.” Reconciliation, he said, is “the best path to confront the difficulties and challenges that you face as a nation.” He described the accord as “a landmark that we greet with the hope that it will prove decisive.” The talks at the presidential palace were also attended by Renamo opposition leader Ossufo Momade. The pope also commiserated with victims of the two cyclones that killed more than 600 and affected hundreds of thousands. “I would like my first words of closeness and solidarity to be addressed to all those struck by cyclones Idai and Kenneth, whose devastating effects continue to be felt by so many families,” he said. “I want you to know of my own participation in your anguish and suffering, and the commitment of the Catholic community to respond to this most difficult situation. “Amid the catastrophe and desolation, I pray that, in God´s providence, constant concern will be shown by all those civil and social groups who make people their priority and are in a position to promote the necessary rebuilding”. The pope asked Mozambicans to be vigilant against pillaging and unethical exploitation of natural resources “driven by a greed generally not cultivated even by the inhabitants of these lands, nor motivated by the common good of your people”. September 04: Pope arrives in Mozambique Thousands of jubilant Catholic faithful on Wednesday welcomed Pope Francis to Mozambique as he kicked off a three-nation tour of African countries, expected to focus on those hard hit by poverty, conflict and natural disaster.* Touching down just after 6:00 pm local time (1600 GMT) Francis was greeted on the tarmac by President Filipe Nyusi, a military band playing the national anthem and a display of traditional dance. The first pope to visit Mozambique since John Paul II in 1988, he was then whisked away in his popemobile, flanked by police bikes as crowds waved signs reading ‘welcome to Mozambique Prophet of reconciliation” and danced in celebration. He stood in his popemobile and waved at the thousands of faithfuls who lined up along the fringes of the city’ main streets as he made the five kilometre (three mile) route from the airport to the Nuncio’s residence in the posh Sommerschield suburb, where he will stay during the visit. Mozambique itinerary On Friday he will address a mass at the giant Zimpeto stadium in the seaside capital Maputo. The pope is expected to discuss the country’s fragile peace process, the devastation caused by two back-to-back cyclones early this year, and the upcoming general election. The three-day visit to Mozambique comes a month after the government signed a historic peace treaty with the former rebel group Renamo, which is now the main opposition party. The 16-year civil war devastated the former Portuguese colony and Renamo has never completely disarmed. The pope may also address the issue of extremism in northern Mozambique where jihadist attacks have claimed more than 300 lives over two years. Expectations of Mozambicans “I hope his visit will bring us effective and long lasting peace,” said Arnaldo Menezes, a 25-year-old student, referring to the treaty with Renamo. “We don’t want war anymore. I want to be able to travel freely across the country, even in the north,” he said. With elections scheduled for October, some fear violence may break out. “He is coming at a time when we Mozambicans are trying to consolidate peace,” said Manuela Muianga, a biologist and disaster relief manager in the capital, Maputo. “We Catholics feel that he is a visionary man who can help Mozambique to strengthen hope and make us forget all those things that make us fight against each other. The biggest concern is the fighting between the two parties. I’m sure he will address this,” she said. The pontiff will only have time to visit Maputo while in Mozambique, much to the disappointment of those in the central city of Beira where Cyclone Idai killed at least 600 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless in March. “Although I am unable to go beyond the capital, my heart reaches out to all of you, with a special place for those of you who live in difficult situations,” he said in a video message, adding: “You are all in my prayers.” The capital has been spruced up for the visit, with the government spending 300,000 euros ($330,000) for the trip, according to Foreign Minister Jose Pacheco, including repairs to Maputo’s cathedral and city roads. Many locals appear happy to splurge on pope-branded regalia. Twenty-nine-year-old Catarina Simbine showed off a Pope-branded cloth known as a capulana. “Me and my fellow congregants from Santa Theresa de Calcutta took about six months preparing for his arrival,” she told AFP. Beatrice Netu, 70, remembered welcoming the pope on his first visit to Mozambique as “one of the biggest privileges of my life”. “I would not be able to handle it if the Pope came up to us and greeted us or touched my hand here where I am standing in the crowd, I would probably faint!” Beyond Mozambique The pope will also visit the large Indian Ocean island of Madagascar and its much smaller and wealthier neighbour Mauritius — both situated off the eastern coast of Africa. Mozambique and Madagascar are among the world’s poorest countries and Francis’ decision to visit is seen by commentators as an act of solidarity from a cleric who was a frequent presence in the shantytowns of Argentina and is now called the “pope of the poor”.

South Africa crush Japan ahead of Rugby World Cup

Africanews  

South Africa cruised to a comfortable 41-7 victory over Japan on Friday in their final World Cup warm-up match, thanks to a hat-trick of tries from Makazole Mapimpi. Winger Cheslin Kolbe opened the scoring with a neat finish on seven minutes, before Mapimpi ran in two easy tries from the other flank as the Springboks built a 22-0 lead at halftime in Kumagaya. Further tries from Mapimpi and Kolbe either side of Kotaro Matsushima’s consolation and a final flourish from Herschel Jantjies secured victory for South Africa and helped soothe the memory of Japan’s famous win at the 2015 World Cup. With this victory, South Africa laid down a tournament marker and gained revenge for defeat four years ago, while Japan must look for improvement in their World Cup opener against Russia on Sept. 20. Africa’s representatives South Africa and Namibia, who will be representing the African continent at this month’s Rugby World Cup, are finalising preparations that they hope will be sufficient to secure glory. Both teams are in Pool B, along with defending champions New Zealand, Italy and Canada. Hosts Japan will open the World Cup against Russia on Sept. 20 in Tokyo before South Africa face old rivals New Zealand in Yokohama. Namibia play their first match against Italy on Sunday 22. South Africa raring to go South Africa, who have won the World Cup twice, are set to play their final warm-up match against hosts, Japan. The Springboks will be wary of Japan who caused one of the biggest upsets in tournament history with their 34-32 victory over them at the 2015 World Cup in England. “You can definitely see this is a much different team, much more fitter, much more stronger. Their systems are working and they know exactly what they are about, they know their strengths and weaknesses,’‘ said Siya Kolisi, South Africa’s captain ahead of the match. Namibia seeks maiden victory Namibia will be seeking their first ever World Cup victory, 20 years after they debuted at the prestigious tournament. They are banking on the experience of their Welsh coaches to end a 19-match losing streak. Former Wales forward Phil Davies has been in charge of a team known as the Welwitschias, a sturdy desert plant, since just before the last World Cup in 2015. Davies works with compatriots Mark Jones (backs) and Dale McIntosh (forwards) as assistant coaches, while another Welshman, Wayne Proctor, is responsible for strength and conditioning. “This is not a case of jobs for the ‘boyos’,” Davies stressed. “They are used to working with full-time and part-time professionals and that is what we have in the Namibian squad.” Scrum-half Eugene Jantjies is set to play at a fourth consecutive World Cup and says the Welwitschias’ aim continues to be finding a winning formula. “This is the best squad we have had for many years and after coming so close to winning four years ago, I believe we can create history in Japan,” he said. READ MORE: South Africa names squad for 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan

African Union welcomes Sudan civilian cabinet, lifts suspension

Africanews  

The African Union (AU) on Friday lifted the suspension it had placed on Sudan, following the establishment of a civilian-led government in the Eastern Africa nation. Sudan’s membership was suspended in June following the violent dispersal of a main protest site in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum during which opposition medics said dozens of people were killed and amidst a standoff between ruling military men and civilian opposition. But after the military and civilian parties and protest groups signed a three-year power-sharing deal in August, Sudan named Abdallah Hamdok as prime minister. On Thursday Hamdok formed the country’s first Cabinet since April, when long-term President Omar al-Bashir was unseated. Meeting in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, the AU’s peace and security council on Friday voted to lift Sudan’s suspension, it wrote on its Twitter page. The statement added that the body was committed to supporting the reconstruction process and mobilising the international community. The Sudanese foreign ministry hailed the decision in a statement on Friday, saying: “(We) use this great occasion to reaffirm our commitment to the goals and objectives of the African Union.” ALSO READ: Sudan’s new PM to prioritize peace and economic alleviation

Hypnobirthing: Why Kenyan couple delivered their baby on YouTube

BBC News Africa  

Kenyan couple Shiko and Rama delivered their baby on their own - then posted it on YouTube.

Robert Mugabe: My complicated relationship with Zimbabwe's former leader

BBC News Africa  

Mugabe is a hero to some, but his legacy has been tainted by oppression and economic collapse.

Q&A with Shamina Singh of the Center for Inclusive Finance

AfricaDotcom  

Africa.com had a chance to do an exclusive interview with Shamina Singh, President of the Center for Inclusive Growth.  This interview comes on the final day of the World Economic Forum Africa, taking place in Cape Town, South Africa.  Shamina had just concluded an event at WEF featuring a panel discussion on research finding that …

Q&A with Shamina Singh of the Center For Inclusive Growth

AfricaDotcom  

Africa.com had a chance to do an exclusive interview with Shamina Singh, President of the Center for Inclusive Growth.  This interview comes on the final day of the World Economic Forum Africa, taking place in Cape Town, South Africa.  Shamina had just concluded an event at WEF featuring a panel discussion on digital transformation hosted …

SA xenophobic attacks: 'fake' videos stoke tension

BBC News Africa  

Videos that are old or from other countries are going viral, misrepresenting events in South Africa.

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