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South Africa: President Cyril Ramaphosa Extends Army Deployment in Western Cape

allAfrica  

[Govt of SA] President Cyril Ramaphosa has in terms of Section 201(2)(a) of the Constitution, read with Section 19 of the Defence Act, extended the employment of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) in crime-affected parts of the Western Cape until 31 March 2020.

Tanzania's Zanzibar registers traditional healers

Africanews  

In Tanzania’s Zanzibar region, traditional healers are being registered by authorities keen to regulate the practitioners who treat everything from depression to hernias. About 340 healers have been registered with their toolkits of herbs, holy scriptures and massages, in accordance with the region’s Traditional and Alternative Medicine Act passed in 2009. There are an estimated 2,000 more healers, or mgangas, hoping to register, said Hassan Combo, the government registrar at the council that records them. One traditional healer’s experience Traditional healer Bi Mwanahija Mzee has already registered. She tends to patients at her busy clinic where women line up in the early morning sun cradling their sick children. One family seeks relief for a child suffering from an umbilical hernia, scared that if they bring the child to hospital for surgery he will die. A pregnant woman who has repeatedly miscarried comes for reassurance, herbs and prayers that this baby will survive. “People come here because I actually help them. I met many patients that went to hospital first and got no help or the medicine didn’t work,” said Mwanahija Mzee, 56. “This is my job six days a week for more than 20 years so I do better, know more than them. Patients that come to me don’t die.” Mwanahija Mzee’s parents were also traditional healers in Zanzibar, an archipelago in the Indian Ocean. Inside the registration process To be registered, mgangas must be aged at least 18, have at least three years of experience and have a recommendation letter from a trained mganga. A council of 11 members that can include birth attendants, respected healers, village elders and lawyers approve the applications each month. While the government does not try to dictate healers’ methods, it tries to work with them on quality control, government registrar Combo said, for example ensuring plants used in medicines are of the same standard. A group facilitated by the registrars office links doctors with traditional healers to give them some medical education on specific diseases like hypertension, diabetes and pregnancy. The mgangas share information with the doctors about patient statistics and needs, he said. How do traditional healers work? Some healers use herbs. Others use scriptures from the Muslim holy book, the Koran. Most use both. Belief in supernatural spirits like djinns features strongly. Some healers, like Haji Mrisho, mainly give blessings to pregnant women to prevent their unborn babies being possessed by djinns. Others, like sheikhs at the Shifaa Herbal clinic, read the Koran to cast out the djinns blamed for many maladies. Mwanahija Mzee uses a mix of massages, medicines from roots, herbs and leaves and Koranic verses, which may be written on a plate in red food colouring. The plate is then rinsed, and the water ingested as part of the medicinal regimen. ALSO READ: Malawi court bans traditional healers to avert albino killings Traditional vs modern healthcare Some patients like Fatma Hamad say they trust traditional healers over the overcrowded, underfunded public hospitals where many feel their ailments are not treated properly. Fatawi Haji Hafidh, manager at Makunduchi Hospital, the second-largest government-run hospital on Zanzibar’s main island, says overstretched doctors and nurses may not have the time to see patients or the diagnostic equipment. Patients may also be unable to afford the medicine prescribed, or they may stop taking it before the course is finished, leading them to relapse and adding to their suspicion of government-run facilities, he said. Many simply believe djinns are the problem. Fatma Hamad took her 2-year-old daughter to hospital after one of the toddler’s legs became paralysed during a high fever. Unable to find the problem through X-rays, the hospital recommended she seek out a traditional healer. Mwanahija Mzee massages the child and after a few appointments, her mobility is slowly improving. The mother has taken this as proof that the illness was caused by possession, “Must be a djinn, as Bi Mwanhija said,” Hamad said. REUTERS

Series: African women writers to read in 2019 (I)

This Is Africa  

Series: African women writers to read in 2019 . In a series of articles, we will highlight a list of books by African women published in 2019.

Tunisia: Optimism for Tunisia's Democracy Despite Low Voter Turnout

allAfrica  

[RFI] Tunisia has wrapped up its first round of presidential elections with turnout low at 45 percent. Despite a drop compared to the country's first democratic presidential election in 2014, there is optimism among voters, particularly younger ones, remain optimistic.

Zimbabwe: Dairy Industry Takes a Knock

allAfrica  

[Zimbabwe Standard] Zimbabwe's dairy herd has declined to below 32 000 from a high of 192 000 in the 1990s, Dairibord Zimbabwe CEO Anthony Mandiwanza has revealed.

Nigeria's 'super camp' strategy questioned as Islamic State fills the void

Africanews  

Nigeria’s new strategy of withdrawing to “super camps” that can be more easily defended against insurgents, is under scrutiny following unchallenged attacks on unprotected towns in the countryside. When Islamic State gunmen stormed the northeast Nigerian town of Magumeri on the night of August 21, they had free rein. Unchallenged, they torched a clinic in Magumeri, ransacked government buildings and looted shops before returning to another town they had raided that night called Gubio, residents said. Nigeria’s new ‘super camp’ strategy The new military strategy announced by President Muhammadu Buhari in July to concentrate soldiers in big bases is designed to give troops a secure platform from which they can respond quickly to threats in the region and raid militant camps. People familiar with the military’s thinking and security officials, however, say the new tactic for fighting Islamic State’s West Africa branch and Boko Haram is mainly an attempt to stem casualties. The military did not respond to requests for more details about its strategy or the impact it will have on the region. “We strongly believe the days of BH (Boko Haram) moving freely and passing in between static defensive locations are over,” Major General Olusegun Adeniyi, who commands the anti-insurgency operation, told reporters last month. ALSO READ: Nigerians crave return to normalcy after 10 years of Boko Haram Is it working? The army’s withdrawal into large bases has coincided with a string of insurgent raids on newly unprotected towns and has left the militants free to set up checkpoints on roads as they roam more freely across the countryside, according to three briefing notes from an international aid and development organisation, two security officials and residents. That has left thousands of civilians without access to aid, according to the briefing notes seen by Reuters. Soldiers are no longer protecting some key roads, cutting off access for humanitarians workers as more of the region falls under the sway of the insurgents, aid and security sources said. “It’s a mess, militarily, and a disaster for humanitarian actors,” one foreign security official said. The population of towns being abandoned by the military is a combined 223,000 people, according to one of the aid agency briefing notes. The military departures so far have cut off more than 100,000 people from aid and if more soldiers go, as many as 121,000 other civilians could flee their towns, one aid agency briefing note said. “The impact will be one of continued skirmishes – soldiers under constant strain to deal with the insurgency where Islamic State and Boko Haram dictate the momentum,” said Jasmine Opperman, a terrorism expert based in South Africa. It’s not yet clear how many “super camps” the army plans to set up, where they will be nor how many soldiers each will hold. Why Nigeria’s army changed strategy The new strategy follows a series of setbacks for the army which has failed to keep a tight grip on territory it has clawed back since 2015. Last year, insurgents repeatedly overran smaller bases and sent soldiers and tens of thousands of people fleeing from larger towns. Security experts put the military death toll since June 2018 at anywhere from hundreds of soldiers to in excess of 1,000. The military has not released casualty figures but denies that many soldiers have been killed. One security adviser at an international aid organisation said a major goal of the new large bases was damage control, rather than going on the offensive. “It is to consolidate all of the strength in one place to prevent them being overrun every week,” the adviser said. He said the areas vacated were being filled by insurgents and that would make it harder for the military to re-enter, leaving civilians vulnerable. Those concerns were echoed by the governor of Borno – the birthplace of Boko Haram and the state worst hit by the insurgency. Governor Babagana Umara Zulum told reporters last month that recent attacks were the result of a “serious vacuum” following the withdrawal of soldiers. Islamists woo locals Islamic State is also using its newfound freedom to woo locals. Drained by the decade-long conflict, some are open to moving into areas controlled by the insurgents where life can be more stable, residents said. Before hitting Magumeri last month, the militants had passed through the town of Gubio, some 40 km (25 miles) to the north. There, an Islamic State fighter led evening prayers followed by a sermon, according to six residents. “We are here to protect you, not to harm any one of you,” the IS fighter told residents. “Those with uniforms are your enemies, and we are here to deal with them and their supporters. You should feel free.” Rather than flee to a government-controlled city such as Borno state’s capital Maiduguri, many Gubio residents stayed. 10 years of Boko Haram Boko Haram launched an insurgency in 2009 to overthrow the government and establish an Islamic caliphate. The group, whose unofficial name means “Western education is forbidden”, held territory the size of Belgium in 2014 but a multinational offensive recaptured much of it the following year. The group split in 2016 and the faction that has been the greater threat ever since won the recognition of Islamic State. The decade of war has killed more than 30,000 civilians and spawned what the United Nations calls one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises, which foreign nations are trying to contain with billions of dollars of aid. But the crisis shows no sign of abating. REUTERS

Check Out the Trailer for Beyoncé's Upcoming Documentary 'Making the Gift'

OkayAfrica  

​The ABC special will offer a behind the scenes look at the making of the album "The Lion King: The Gift" and features Burna Boy, Yemi Alade and more.

South Africa: High Court Rules RICA to be 'Unlawful and Invalid'

allAfrica  

[News24Wire] Investigative journalism centre amaBhungane walked out of court victorious on Monday after successfully challenging parts of South Africa's surveillance law, the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-Related Information Act (RICA).

Tunisia: Tunisia Election - Political Outsiders Headed to Runoff

allAfrica  

[Deutsche Welle] An imprisoned populist who owns a TV channel and a reserved law professor are the two leading candidates. The vote has been widely seen as a stress test for Tunisia's fledgling democracy.

11 tribes looking to break away from Ethiopia told to be patient

Africanews  

On Sunday, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed asked ethnic groups pushing to form breakaway regions to be patient and join him in building “a great Ethiopia”. Abiy made the plea during a visit to leaders of the Kafficho ethnic group, that are seeking to create a new federal state heightening further destabilization in Ethiopia’s diverse southern region. “You think that there will be many problems in your problems, there are many interrelated and systemic issues that need to be considered.,” said Abiy Ahmed, Ethiopian Prime Minister. The southern region was rocked by violence two months ago following a similar campaign by the Sidama ethnic group. “We have historical problems, that’s why it’s so much about being sensational or tribalistic,” Meaza Assefa, local merchant. Ethiopia’s constitution requires the government to organise a referendum for any ethnic group that wants to form a new entity. At least 11 groups have submitted such bids in the south.

Bob Hewitt: South Africa stops early release of rapist former tennis star

BBC News Africa  

Bob Hewitt, 79, has his early release on parole suspended following a public outcry.

Malawi: Govt to Bring Back 113 Malawians Stranded in South Africa

allAfrica  

[Nyasa Times] Government says it is working with the International Organisation for Migration to bring back home 113 Malawians who are in deplorable camps after running away from xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

Zimbabwe doctors protest over abduction of Association President Dr Peter Magombeyi

This Is Africa  

Zimbabwean doctors are staging a demonstration against the alleged abduction of their union leader, Peter Magombeyi, who was kidnapped on Saturday

Uganda: Rwanda-Uganda Talks Start Today in Kigali

allAfrica  

[Monitor] The talks to end the diplomatic row between Uganda and Rwanda start today in Kigali.

Rugby World Cup: South Africa hopes for fairness in clash with New Zealand

Africanews  

South Africa calls for fairness South Africa’s Springboks on Monday called on the French referee Jerome Garces to treat them as equals during this weekend’s opening Pool B blockbuster clash with defending champions New Zealand. Assistant South Africa coach Mzwandile Stick said that with the gap between the All Blacks and their potential rivals for the Webb Ellis Cup closing, match officials need to be consistent in how they applied the laws to all teams. In the past, World Cup-winning All Blacks captain Richie McCaw, a wizard in the loose, was often accused of influencing referees to rule in his favour at the breakdown. “The fans are excited by this one and looking forward to it,” former South Africa sevens specialist Stick said of the Saturday’s showdown in Yokohama. “Hopefully the officials maybe will treat everything equally and respect the game and also respect the fans.” South Africa topped New Zealand in this year’s Rugby Championship and Ireland are currently ranked world number one but Stick said the All Blacks remain the team to beat. “If you look at previous history when it comes to the All Blacks, they’ve been dominating at Test level and it’s always the case that whenever they go to the World Cup they are favourites,” he said. Recent history between the Boks, who are blooming under coach Rassie Erasmus, and Steve Hansen’s All Blacks promises to make for a tight encounter on Saturday. “Things are a lot more balanced between us an New Zealand right now,” Stick said. “We can’t ask for any better build-up towards the World Cup: if you look at the last three games we played against the All Blacks, in Wellington last year we won by two points, they came to Pretoria and won by two points, and then we drew against them again this year in Wellington. “We’re looking forward to this challenge, it’s going to be a tough one… against one of the best teams in the world and given the history between the two teams.” AFP South Africa defeats Japan South Africa cruised to a comfortable 41-7 victory over Japan on Friday in their final World Cup warm-up match, thanks to a hat-trick of tries from Makazole Mapimpi. Winger Cheslin Kolbe opened the scoring with a neat finish on seven minutes, before Mapimpi ran in two easy tries from the other flank as the Springboks built a 22-0 lead at halftime in Kumagaya. Further tries from Mapimpi and Kolbe either side of Kotaro Matsushima’s consolation and a final flourish from Herschel Jantjies secured victory for South Africa and helped soothe the memory of Japan’s famous win at the 2015 World Cup. With this victory, South Africa laid down a tournament marker and gained revenge for defeat four years ago, while Japan must look for improvement in their World Cup opener against Russia on Sept. 20. Africa’s representatives South Africa and Namibia, who will be representing the African continent at this month’s Rugby World Cup, are finalising preparations that they hope will be sufficient to secure glory. Both teams are in Pool B, along with defending champions New Zealand, Italy and Canada. Hosts Japan will open the World Cup against Russia on Sept. 20 in Tokyo before South Africa face old rivals New Zealand in Yokohama. Namibia play their first match against Italy on Sunday 22. South Africa raring to go South Africa, who have won the World Cup twice, are set to play their final warm-up match against hosts, Japan. The Springboks will be wary of Japan who caused one of the biggest upsets in tournament history with their 34-32 victory over them at the 2015 World Cup in England. “You can definitely see this is a much different team, much more fitter, much more stronger. Their systems are working and they know exactly what they are about, they know their strengths and weaknesses,’‘ said Siya Kolisi, South Africa’s captain ahead of the match. Namibia seeks maiden victory Namibia will be seeking their first ever World Cup victory, 20 years after they debuted at the prestigious tournament. They are banking on the experience of their Welsh coaches to end a 19-match losing streak. Former Wales forward Phil Davies has been in charge of a team known as the Welwitschias, a sturdy desert plant, since just before the last World Cup in 2015. Davies works with compatriots Mark Jones (backs) and Dale McIntosh (forwards) as assistant coaches, while another Welshman, Wayne Proctor, is responsible for strength and conditioning. “This is not a case of jobs for the ‘boyos’,” Davies stressed. “They are used to working with full-time and part-time professionals and that is what we have in the Namibian squad.” Scrum-half Eugene Jantjies is set to play at a fourth consecutive World Cup and says the Welwitschias’ aim continues to be finding a winning formula. “This is the best squad we have had for many years and after coming so close to winning four years ago, I believe we can create history in Japan,” he said. READ MORE: South Africa names squad for 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan

Ethiopia: Ethiopia Must Do More to Stop Recurring Chikungunya Outbreaks

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[The Conversation Africa] Ethiopia's second largest city, Dire Dawa, is dealing with a chikungunya fever outbreak. Around 20,000 cases of the mosquito-borne viral infection have been reported since the outbreak started in March 2019. This is the second recorded outbreak of the disease in the country; the first was in 2016. Eunice Anyango Owino spoke to The Conversation Africa about the disease and the burden it places on public health.

Big Zulu Delivers Hard Raps Over Maskandi-Inspired Production in His New Album

OkayAfrica  

South African rapper Big Zulu returns with his sophomore album.

Namibia: Establishment of a Compulsory National Youth Service in the Pipeline

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[Namibia Economist] The government is eyeing the establishment of a compulsory national youth service with the aim to address socio-economic and security concerns in the country, an official said last week.

Caf Appeal Board rejects Wydad's Champions League case

BBC News Africa  

Moroccan side Wydad Casablanca's case over African Champions League final is rejected by Caf's Appeal Board.

South Africa: High Court Finds Restaurant Rapist Guilty

allAfrica  

[allAfrica] Cape Town -The North Gauteng High Court has officially found Nicholas Ninow guilty of rape, News24 reports.

Ivory Coast: opposition parties PDCI-RDA, FPI unite forces [The Morning Call]

Africanews  

In Ivory Coast, a joint meeting of the PDCI-RDA coalition of Henry Konan Bedié and the FPI of former president Laurent Gbagbo took place on saturday. With about 10,000 people in the sports park of Treichville in Abidjan, opposition activists unite forces to insist on the reform of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) and security of votes in the upcoming 2020 elections.

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